9 ways to make your own stimulus check (and forget Congress)

For a while there, it was looking pretty certain that Americans were going to get another round of those $1,200 coronavirus “stimulus checks.”

Democrats, Republicans and the White House all said they wanted to give out more money to relieve financial pain and stimulate the economy, and the U.S. House voted in May to provide fresh payments. But stimulus money was missing from a COVID-19 relief bill that was just introduced in the Senate — and promptly died.

If you could use another $1,200 right now, why wait around while Washington plays the usual games? Here’s a better game: look around and find your own sources of cash, to give yourself a stimulus check. Check out these nine ways to create one on your own.

1. Curb your car insurance costs

ADragan / Shutterstock

If you’re like most people, your car insurance is due every six months. It’s very

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10 ways to make your own stimulus check (and forget Congress)

For a while there, it was looking pretty certain that Americans were going to get another round of those $1,200 coronavirus “stimulus checks.”

Democrats, Republicans and the White House all said they wanted to give out more money to relieve financial pain and stimulate the economy, and the U.S. House voted in May to provide fresh payments. But stimulus money was missing from a COVID-19 relief bill that was just introduced in the Senate — and promptly died.

If you could use another $1,200 right now, why wait around while Washington plays the usual games? Here’s a better game: look around and find your own sources of cash, to give yourself a stimulus check. Check out these six ways to create one on your own.

1. Curb your car insurance costs

ADragan / Shutterstock

If you’re like most people, your car insurance is due every six months. It’s very

Read More

Did an out-of-control home renovation lead to murder?

A successful businesswoman is found dead in the bathtub. Her home had been under construction for years. Did the renovation lead to her death? Correspondent Erin Moriarty reports in “Home Renovation Homicide.”

“This house became more than just a project to David Tronnes. It was his life,” says Ryan Vescio, a former prosecutor with the Orlando State Attorney’s Office. Vescio led the investigation into the death of Shanti Cooper. “He obsessed on it … this house is the center point to the story.”

Shanti Cooper and Dave Tronnes met on Match.com in March 2013. / Credit: Shanti Cooper
Shanti Cooper and Dave Tronnes met on Match.com in March 2013. / Credit: Shanti Cooper

Dave Tronnes was living in Minnesota in 2013 when he met Shanti Cooper on Match.com. Both were going through a divorce, and Shanti had a young son. After a whirlwind online courtship, Dave moved to join Shanti in Orlando and bought the house on East Copeland Drive in April 2015. Three years

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Was a man’s obsession with a home renovation a motive for murder?

Produced by Paul LaRosa and Dena Goldstein

In 2015, Dave Tronnes found the house of his dreams — a gargoyle-adorned home in the upscale Orlando, Florida, neighborhood of Delaney Park.

“The house was beautiful,” realtor Tara Stevens told “48 Hours” correspondent Erin Moriarty. “It was 4,000 square feet. It had a pool, a garage apartment.”

Stevens sold Dave the house for a little more than $600,000 and it wasn’t long before Dave and his new wife Shanti Cooper began remodeling — in their own way. 

“Dave just called me on the phone … and asked if I’d come by and take a look at the project, he said that they had done some work,” said local contractor Keith Ori.

But “some work,” didn’t quite describe what he found.

“They had — fully disassembled this house to a degree that — I’d never seen before. It was rather astonishing,” Ori told

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