6 Ways 2020 Will Change Our Children, According to Psychologists & Pediatricians

Hey Mama, how ya doing? Hanging on by a thread? Same, same.

But amidst all the worrying about schools and pods and daily case counts, many parents are also up at night with a far more existential question: How will this absolutely bonkers year affect our children, long-term?

We checked in with the experts—two pediatricians and a pediatric psychologist—to learn what they’re seeing, what they’re fearing and how they think the current world will shape our kids’ lives. (Spoiler: It’s not all bad.) 

1. Kids will be more technologically savvy and computer literate

Does your 4-year-old now know how to un-mute himself? Is your budding Mia Hamm completely comfortable with Zoom soccer lessons? While we parents may look on in horror, the fact is that this pandemic will inevitably make our children more computer literate, and that’s not necessarily a bad thing.

Says pediatric phycologist Dr. Ann-Louise Lockhart, “Due to

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‘I don’t want to die’: Blast traumatises Beirut children

“I don’t want to die.” Those were the first words Hiba’s six-year-old son screamed after the massive explosion at Beirut port sent shards of glass flying around their house. 

The blast a week ago that temporarily displaced 100,000 children, according to a UN estimate, was so mighty it had the magnitude of an earthquake.

The mental shock it caused among Beirut’s youngest was just as powerful.

When the boy saw blood on his feet, “he started screaming: ‘Mom, I don’t want to die’,” Hiba recalled.

“What is this life? Coronavirus and an explosion!,” her son told her after the blast.

“Imagine that!” said the mother. “A child only six years old asking this question.”

The 35-year-old mother of two, who asked to withhold the names of her children and their family name, said her entire building shook when the catastrophe struck on August 4. 

Her son, who was sitting on

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I’m a 19-year-old TikTok influencer. Here’s how I turned social media into a job

Parker James, 19, is a social media creator based in Dallas, Texas, who has made a name for himself on TikTok through his family-friendly comedic character “StEvEn.” His character is the endearing and curious CEO of the Dino Club, a fictitious club he created for dinosaur lovers. Below James shares in his own words how he went from being an average high schooler to a TikTok powerhouse with over 6 million followers, a talent agent and making a living from creating videos.

I’ve always enjoyed making others happy.

When I was younger, I started making funny videos in hopes of making my friends and family laugh. Their reactions always made me so proud and motivated me to continue to come up with new jokes and skits.

However, as I grew older I got more into sports than my previous comedy passions. Unfortunately, while trying out a new trick on my

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‘Find Kristin Smart’ group says it’s serious about buying home next to Paul Flores’ mom

A group of community advocates seeking justice for missing Cal Poly student Kristin Smart is floating the idea of buying an Arroyo Grande home next to the property of Susan Flores.

Flores is the mother of Paul Flores, the last person seen with Smart when the 19-year-old woman went missing after a party in San Luis Obispo in 1996.

Members of the Find Kristin Smart Facebook group started discussing the idea when the home on the 500 block of East Branch Street was listed for sale online. The group had more than 30,000 members as of Monday.

“Ok serious proposal,” group member Pascoe Bowen wrote on Aug. 5. “What if we bought the house for sale next door to (Susan Flores) and turned it into the Kristin Smart memorial museum, and research center for missing people? The house is selling for $700,000, we have over 29,000 members in this group.

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Austin Apartment Association To Launch Food Drive

AUSTIN, TX — The Austin Apartment Association will kick off its 34th annual Doc & Gayle Young Food Drive with a “Gobble Trot” parade this week, officials announced on Monday.

The event is scheduled on Wednesday (Aug. 12) from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. starting at the Association’s office at 8620 Burnett Rd. The volunteer-driven fundraiser will run through mid-November with a goal of raising $25,000 to purchase 100,000 meals for residents in the Association’s 11-county Central Texas jurisdiction, organizers said in an advisory.

The food drive began in 1986 when the Austin Apartment Association’s Community Service committee raised $600 to feed hungry Austinites, officials explained. In recent years, more than 100 member volunteers collected funds, purchased food and hand-delivered collected food packets to its partner organizations, according to event organizers. This year, due to the pandemic, increased community need and social distancing guidelines, the fundraiser will start nearly a

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Illness and a Texas detour left Bru McCoy hurting. Clay Helton helped him turn a corner

A mysterious illness left USC receiver Bru McCoy is a bad frame of mind. It took a one-on-one meeting with coach Clay Helton to help McCoy turn a corner. <span class="copyright">(John McGillen / USC Athletics)</span>
A mysterious illness left USC receiver Bru McCoy is a bad frame of mind. It took a one-on-one meeting with coach Clay Helton to help McCoy turn a corner. (John McGillen / USC Athletics)

Drenched in sweat, short of breath, Bru McCoy sank into the leather of his dormitory room couch late last summer, wondering if his misery would ever end.

The last year had been the most difficult of his life. The very public transfer saga from USC to Texas and back to USC. The hailstorm of online hate in its wake. Feelings of betrayal, self-doubt, uncertainty, regret. McCoy weathered it all, hellbent on proving wrong every online stranger who’d questioned his heart or condemned his character.

He left Austin in May 2019 and returned to L.A. determined to turn the tables. Then, his body turned on him.

The exhaustion set in just days after he arrived at USC.

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I Did My Own Abortion Because Texas Used COVID-19 as an Excuse to Shut Down Abortion Clinics

Photo credit: Raydene Hansen - Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Raydene Hansen – Hearst Owned

From Cosmopolitan

Shortly after Esmarie* learned she was pregnant in mid-March, the city in South Central Texas where she lives started to shut down in response to the coronavirus. Her college classes went online and she lost shifts at the two restaurants where she works, leaving her barely able to afford groceries. She knew right away that she did not want to continue the pregnancy, but feared abortion clinics would soon be shut down, too. It would be another six weeks before she was able to resolve her pregnancy with a self-managed abortion using abortion pills, which, when used as directed, have a success rate of 95 percent and are an increasingly popular option during the pandemic (one study showed a 27 percent rise in requests across the U.S., and a 94 percent increase in demand in Texas). Esmarie, 19, told us

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Walmart Just Revealed Which 160 Locations Are Being Turned Into Drive-In Movie Theaters

Photo credit: Walmart
Photo credit: Walmart

From Best Products

UPDATED: Aug. 10, 2020 at 9:37 a.m.

Getting tired of watching movies in your living room? Grab the whole family and load up in the car to enjoy a free movie night, thanks to Walmart! From Aug. 14 to Oct. 21, 160 Walmart parking lot locations will be transformed into pop-up movie theaters.

Walmart has partnered with the Tribeca Film Festival to create the movie theaters. The family-friendly movies will include classics like The Wizard of Oz, The Goonies, and Space Jam, as well as recent hits like Black Panther and Spider-Man: Into The Spider-Verse. There will be a total of 320 movies shown across the locations.

All of the drive-in movies are free, but you have to reserve your space beforehand. The gates will open at 6 p.m. and movies will start at 7:30 p.m. To find the closest

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Poland Enters Oscar Race With Venice Contender ‘Never Gonna Snow Again’

In today’s Global Bulletin, Poland makes its Oscars pick, VIS gets a new VP, Transilvania closes its ceremonies, the Barbican plans to reopen its doors, BlackBox Multimedia supports suicide prevention NPO Calm, and Studio 100 readies “SeaBelievers” for Mipcom.

OSCARS

Poland has submitted Malgorzata Szumowska’s “Never Gonna Snow Again” as the country’s 2021 Oscar submission, making it the first country out the gate in this year’s Academy Awards race.

More from Variety

Set to premiere in competition at the Venice Film Festival, the comedy stars “Stranger Things” alum Alec Utgoff and “Ida” actress Agata Kulesza in the story of a Ukrainian masseuse in Poland who rises to cult-like status among wealthy clientele amassed while working in a gated community.

Szumowska (“In the Name Of,” “Body”), Polish cinematic royalty with several Berlin, European Film and Locarno awards — to list just a few — to her name, co-wrote the script with

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Mysterious illness made USC’s Bru McCoy think he’d die. Coach Helton helped him heal

A mysterious illness left USC receiver Bru McCoy is a bad frame of mind. It took a one-on-one meeting with coach Clay Helton to help McCoy turn a corner. <span class="copyright">(John McGillen / USC Athletics)</span>
A mysterious illness left USC receiver Bru McCoy is a bad frame of mind. It took a one-on-one meeting with coach Clay Helton to help McCoy turn a corner. (John McGillen / USC Athletics)

Drenched in sweat, short of breath, Bru McCoy sank into the leather of his dormitory room couch late last summer, wondering if his misery would ever end.

The last year had been the most difficult of his life. The very public transfer saga from USC to Texas and back to USC. The hailstorm of online hate in its wake. Feelings of betrayal, self-doubt, uncertainty, regret. McCoy weathered it all, hellbent on proving wrong every online stranger who’d questioned his heart or condemned his character.

He left Austin in May 2019 and returned to L.A. determined to turn the tables. Then, his body turned on him.

The exhaustion set in just days after he arrived at USC.

Read More