A 4th grade teacher has built her own, outdoor classroom amid COVID-19

A fourth grade teacher has built an outdoor classroom as her students return to in-person learning during the pandemic.

With help from her family, Lindsey Earle, of Prairie Hill Waldorf School in Pewaukee, Wisconsin, built a structure for the 13 students in her class.

“As we were discussing plans for returning and things looked a little doomsday-ish, I proposed an idea that we build our own classroom,” Earle told “Good Morning America.” “Because what we know about coronavirus, is it spreads less effectively outdoors.”

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says outdoor spaces are less risky when it comes to the spread of COVID-19. It may be more difficult to keep people apart indoors, and there’s less ventilation. The CDC recommends keeping six feet of space between you and others.

PHOTO: With help from her family, Lindsey Earle, of Prairie Hill Waldorf School in Pewaukee, Wisconsin, built an outdoor

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How to explore the seaside towns of southern Maine during COVID-19

Since March 2020, we’ve been adapting to life amid a pandemic. While many challenges arose, so too did creativity, inspiration and perseverance. A new sense of getting back to nature sprouted as many of us paused and appreciated the world around us.

To celebrate the many majestic communities across the U.S., TMRW is packing its bags and reviving the classic American road trip. Join us in the passenger’s seat as we explore, eat and rest in southern Maine. It’s time to get on the road again.

Maine is a spacious, scenic state dusted with quaint seaside towns and cities along its coast. With a statewide population that is one-eighteenth of New York City, this serene destination was made for outdoor experiences and social distancing long before COVID-19.

According to a survey of 450 people conducted by Live and Work in Maine, a nonprofit initiative that promotes quality work-life opportunities, the

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College Runner Is Still Struggling Months After a COVID-19 Diagnosis

Photo credit: Courtesy of Natalie Hakala
Photo credit: Courtesy of Natalie Hakala

From Men’s Health

COVID-19’s affect on your health is a rapidly developing situation. For the most up-to-date information, check in with your local health officials and resources like the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) regularly.

One sign that runner Natalie Hakala is making progress in her recovery from COVID-19: She can finish her sentences now. Just a few weeks ago, she would have to stop after a few words to catch her breath.

The struggle to hold a conversation is just one of the problems Hakala, 22, has experienced in the two months since she was diagnosed with COVID-19. She’s what’s known as a COVID-19 “long-hauler,” someone whose symptoms persist for weeks or months. Hakala described having a rapid heart rate, brain fog, and consistent headaches unlike any headache she’s had before.

“It’s directly behind my eyes,” she told Runner’s World.

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COVID-19 Sparks Changes in Home Life Among US Families

2020 will undoubtedly be a year to remember, but no one could’ve predicted that it would also change the way people exist inside their homes. The deadly coronavirus pandemic has affected virtually all areas of life, and family life is no exception.

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, home offices everywhere have changed to accommodate spaces for kids' homeschooling.
As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, home offices everywhere have changed to accommodate spaces for kids’ homeschooling.

Although the ideas of students being homeschooled and adults working from home have always been around, both were still relatively rare before the pandemic. Now that they’ve become the new norm, parents are trying out all sorts of new things to prepare accordingly.

One family in Montclair, New Jersey has simply brought their inside office outside. Ms. Meehan has propped her chair on her front lawn and is now ready to work. Although an outdoor office is not everyone’s first choice, it seems to be the best choice for this

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Antarctica is still free of COVID-19. Can it stay that way?

JOHANNESBURG (AP) — At this very moment a vast world exists that’s free of the coronavirus, where people can mingle without masks and watch the pandemic unfold from thousands of miles away.

That world is Antarctica, the only continent without COVID-19. Now, as nearly 1,000 scientists and others who wintered over on the ice are seeing the sun for the first time in weeks or months, a global effort wants to make sure incoming colleagues don’t bring the virus with them.

From the U.K.’s Rothera Research Station off the Antarctic peninsula that curls toward the tip of South America, field guide Rob Taylor described what it’s like in “our safe little bubble.”

In pre-coronavirus days, long-term isolation, self-reliance and psychological strain were the norm for Antarctic teams while the rest of the world saw their life as fascinatingly extreme.

How times have changed.

“In general, the freedoms afforded to us

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How COVID-19 is fueling a new wave of Bay Area transplants to the Sacramento region

Jesse and Shanni Burke were working on their laptops a few feet apart in their cramped Silicon Valley apartment this spring, sweltering without air conditioning, when it dawned on them.

The coronavirus pandemic that was virtually imprisoning them in their tiny downtown San Jose walk-up also offered an unexpected escape option. No longer tethered to the office, they could live almost anywhere outside the pricey Bay Area and keep their jobs.

Last week, the couple moved into a 2,700-square-foot home on a leafy street in the suburban Sacramento community of Fair Oaks. It’s their first home purchase. They’ll turn two of the four bedrooms into his and hers offices. And they plan to add a gym and a backyard pool.

“Because of COVID, we didn’t want to be stuck in a tiny space,” Shanni, a 34-year-old tech worker, said. “But we knew there was no way we could afford in

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During COVID-19, many doctors and patients are using telehealth to keep connected

Dr. Sarvam TerKonda of the Mayo Clinic Center for Connected Care consults with a patient.
Dr. Sarvam TerKonda of the Mayo Clinic Center for Connected Care consults with a patient.

In 2019, Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida was ramping up its virtual options for patients, and providers conducted about 100 appointments by video throughout the year. This spring, with people staying home as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, the clinic was performing about 600 virtual patient visits per day. 

“I think that’s been a real advantage of the pandemic — it’s really allowed us to utilize telemedicine to benefit both patients and clinicians,” says Dr. Sarvam TerKonda, a plastic surgeon and a medical director for Mayo Clinic Center for Connected Care.

And Mayo Clinic patients have embraced the change and are pleased with the process: Surveys are showing that 95 percent to 98 percent of patients rate the video appointments as a  positive experience, TerKonda says.

During the pandemic, doctors in many parts of

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RydeFYR Owner Chevy Laurent Keeps Business Afloat During COVID-19

MANHATTAN BEACH, CA — For RydeFYR business owner Chevy Laurent, she could not have predicted what a rough ride opening her own indoor cycling studio would be. After quitting her full-time job and putting her life savings into creating a state-of-the-art heated indoor cycling experience with custom-built bikes, COVID-19 struck.

“So in March [2020], just one year after taking on the expense of our space, and just a few months after officially opening our doors, just as we were starting to build momentum and grow as a new small-business, the pandemic hit and stay-at-home orders were imposed by the Governor,” she said. “And I’ve got to be perfectly honest when I say this was a really devastating blow. But at the time, it was what we were told we all needed to do to flatten the curve and keep everyone safe.

“And when we were told it was going to

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The impact canceled AAU tournaments due to COVID-19 is having on college basketball prospects

We like you and we’re interested, but we want to see you play live. 

The head coach will be coming out to see you.

I look forward to watching you on the AAU trail this summer. 

Mid-level college basketball prospects hear some version of these phrases over and over from programs in conversations with coaches throughout high school. 

The fate of their careers, delivered in the form of an official offer, is often determined by their performance on the hardwood of gyms filled with dozens of teams and a steady stream of coaches and analysts eager to discover the next hidden gem in the heart of summer on the Amateur Athletic Union circuit. 

None of those promises have come to fruition this year as the three major circuits — Nike Elite Youth Basketball, Adidas Gauntlet and Under Armour Association — completely canceled their national string of tournaments by the end

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How COVID-19 has impacted college basketball prospects

The head coach will be coming out to see you.

Mid-level college basketball prospects hear some version of these phrases over and over from programs in conversations with coaches throughout high school. 

The fate of their careers, delivered in the form of an official offer, is often determined by their performance on the hardwood of gyms filled with dozens of teams and a steady stream of coaches and analysts eager to discover the next hidden gem in the heart of summer on the Amateur Athletic Union circuit. 

None of those promises have come to fruition this year as the three major circuits — Nike Elite Youth Basketball, Adidas Gauntlet and Under Armour Association — completely canceled their national string of tournaments by the end of May in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Some programs have now started competing in small tournaments, though there is much less competition and exposure, … Read More