How do you teach performing arts when there are no performances? This school is learning

PHOENIX — For Monica Sauer Anthony, adapting to the challenge of a virtual classroom started with a reenvisioning of what it even means to teach at a performing arts school.

A choir can’t really rehearse in a virtual classroom much less give a live performance.

Neither can an orchestra.

There’s too much digital delay involved in streaming to get everybody synced up.

When Gov. Doug Ducey ordered Arizona schools to close in March because of the pandemic, Sauer Anthony was teaching Music History and Culture, and Beginning Woodwinds, Flute and Oboe Studies at Arizona School for the Arts in downtown Phoenix.

As ASA began to make the switch to online learning, Sauer Anthony, who’s since become arts director and vice principal of student services, said the faculty was trying to maintain as much of a sense of normalcy as it could.

Teachers changed their focus

They did some virtual performing

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They Work Full Time. They Attend School. They’re Only Teenagers.

Daniela, 18, is a California high school senior and also works at a restaurant to provide for her family during the coronavirus pandemic. "I want to study forensic pathology at San Jose State," Daniela said. "Applications are due in November." (Photo: Sarahbeth Maney for HuffPost)
Daniela, 18, is a California high school senior and also works at a restaurant to provide for her family during the coronavirus pandemic. “I want to study forensic pathology at San Jose State,” Daniela said. “Applications are due in November.” (Photo: Sarahbeth Maney for HuffPost)

The beginning of the pandemic hit Daniela, a junior in high school, with overwhelming force.

At the same time her high school shut down, her mom, who was six months pregnant, lost her job, and as a person who entered the country without documentation, she was excluded from federal assistance. Her stepdad, a construction worker, had his hours sharply reduced. Daniela would hear her mom crying about not having enough money and reluctantly asking friends for loans.

Daniela needed to help. 

The teen previously spent her weekends working at a Mexican restaurant, using the extra cash to pitch in here and there. By the

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3 families chose between online and in-person school. Now they’re questioning their decisions.

DETROIT — A few days before the start of the eighth grade, Jonah Beasley considered the risks he’d face when he walked back into the classroom and summed them up in stark terms.

He could get Covid-19 from a classmate or a teacher, he said, and “if I get it, I’ll probably die.”

A veteran of two heart transplants, Jonah, a soft-spoken teen who loves football and basketball, takes medicine that suppresses his immune system. He has a long list of health issues that his parents initially thought would force them to choose virtual instruction this year.

But Jonah’s lengthy hospital stays have already put him behind his peers academically and socially, said his mother, Peggy Carr-McMichael. He’s 15, two years older than most of his classmates. And Carr-McMichael saw how difficult it was for him to focus on his schoolwork and speak up during video classes last spring after

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Two weeks in, Detroit parents question tough choices about school

DETROIT — A few days before the start of the eighth grade, Jonah Beasley considered the risks he’d face when he walked back into the classroom and summed them up in stark terms.

He could get Covid-19 from a classmate or a teacher, he said, and “if I get it, I’ll probably die.”

A veteran of two heart transplants, Jonah, a soft-spoken teen who loves football and basketball, takes medicine that suppresses his immune system. He has a long list of health issues that his parents initially thought would force them to choose virtual instruction this year.

But Jonah’s lengthy hospital stays have already put him behind his peers academically and socially, said his mother, Peggy Carr-McMichael. He’s 15, two years older than most of his classmates. And Carr-McMichael saw how difficult it was for him to focus on his schoolwork and speak up during video classes last spring after

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How Remote Learning Has Changed The Nature Of School Bullying

Remote learning may reduce bullying in some respects, but teachers who require students to leave their cameras on may give bullies more fodder for taunting. (Photo: Imgorthand via Getty Images)
Remote learning may reduce bullying in some respects, but teachers who require students to leave their cameras on may give bullies more fodder for taunting. (Photo: Imgorthand via Getty Images)

For most kids across the country, remote learning means school looks very different this year. Nearly three-fourths of the nation’s largest school districts have chosen virtual learning as their only instructional model for the beginning of the academic year, according to a Sept. 2 update from Education Week magazine.

Classes via Zoom helps protect the health and safety of teaching staff, students and their families. Does the shift in the style of instruction keep kids safe from the threat of school bullies, too? 

There’s certainly less opportunities for bullies to do their biddings, but parents shouldn’t let their guard down entirely: Experts say that with the increase in screen time, cyberbullies may find new, covert ways to pick on their

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COVID-era virtual school supplies come with real spike in spending

Back-to-school shopping is looking different for many families this year, thanks to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. With the 73 of the 100 largest U.S. school districts opting for remote learning this fall, backpacks are out – and Bluetooth headphones and Chromebooks are in.

That’s upending the budgets for many families and helps explain why back-to-school spending is set to break a record in 2020. Households with children in kindergarten through 12th grade will spend an average of almost $790 per family this year – a record as well as 13% higher than a year earlier, according to National Retail Federation, a trade group.

That jibes with the experiences of several families in Houston, the nation’s 9th largest school district, who shared their experiences with USA Today. When the city’s schools switched to online learning this spring due to the pandemic, many parents relied on makeshift arrangements, such as turning the

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School campuses in affluent areas plan to open quicker than those in poor Latino ones

Principal Ryan Stanley, left, welcomes second-grader Maeva Chappaz, with her mother, Amelie Chappaz, upon arrival for her first day of in-class instruction at Ocean Air School in the Del Mar Union School District. <span class="copyright">( Bill Wechter / San Diego Union-Tribune)</span>
Principal Ryan Stanley, left, welcomes second-grader Maeva Chappaz, with her mother, Amelie Chappaz, upon arrival for her first day of in-class instruction at Ocean Air School in the Del Mar Union School District. ( Bill Wechter / San Diego Union-Tribune)

The Capistrano Unified School District is ready to go, preparing to start welcoming students back to class on Sept. 28, soon after Orange County is expected to meet the state’s COVID-19 requirements for reopening schools.

But 25 miles northwest, Santa Ana Unified School District officials have laid out a more sobering timetable. Elementary schoolchildren probably won’t be back to class until at least November. High school students? Possibly not until early 2021.

“We have some of the highest COVID rates in all of Orange County,” Santa Ana district spokesman Fermin Leal said. “We’re not going to reopen just because the state tells us it’s OK, or the county gives us

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Mexico tortilla shop gives free TV, internet for school kids

MEXICO CITY (AP) — A tortilla shop has started giving free wifi and television access for kids in its Mexico City neighborhood whose homes don’t have them, or whose brothers and sisters are already using the services for remote learning during the pandemic.

Mexico’s government schools started at-distance classes Aug. 24 using televised lessons due to the coronavirus, because 94% of Mexican homes have TVs. But there are often many youngsters in a Mexican family and they all need to look up something online or watch classes at the same time.

That is where the “Rinconcito de Esperanza” — the Corner of Hope — comes in. The owners of Grandma’s Tortilla Shop in the southern borough of Tlalpan set up learning areas to offer free tutoring, TV and computer access.

The assemblage of space spills out of the store into a tent set up on the sidewalk outside, and continues

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13 products you’ll love for the school year

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Back to school shopping? Sorted.
Back to school shopping? Sorted.

Yahoo Lifestyle Canada is committed to finding you the best products at the best prices. We may receive a share from purchases made via links on this page. Pricing and availability are subject to change.

Going back to school this year looks very different for a lot of students but that doesn’t mean that you aren’t allowed to get excited to purchase school supplies.

According to survey results from RetailMeNot.ca, 22 per cent of Canadian parents are considering homeschooling as an option for their children this year, which means that their shopping habits are changing too.

ALSO SEE: The best back to school tech at any age, according to an expert

The survey also reports that 65 per cent of parents are prioritizing school supplies such

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How to make sure children are mentally prepared for the big return to school

A child in a facemask - E+/ Vladimir Vladimirov
A child in a facemask – E+/ Vladimir Vladimirov

When school starts next week, some pupils won’t have seen a classroom for nearly six months. However, the doughty 11-year-olds of Highgate Primary School in Haringey had a preview of Covid-era school life when they briefly returned in the summer term. After entering the playground through a different gate, they queued at a new handwashing station.

“We got the children to hold out their hands and supervised the hand wash for them,” recalls Rebecca Lewis, deputy head and Senco (special educational needs coordinator). “On that first morning, at least half had trembling hands.” But by the following day, she says, pupils’ anxiety had vanished – testament to the support of staff and parents.

From extra hygiene measures to year-group bubbles and socially-distant playtimes, the school year ahead is going to feel significantly, uncomfortably different, and many children may find it hard

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