Hitting the Books: How social media keeps us clicking


Your Brain on Social Media 

So our brains are wired to process social signals. What then happens to our brains on social media? 

Neuroscientists at UCLA wanted to know, so they created an Instagram-style app to study how the brain reacts when we scroll through photos in our Instagram feed. The app displayed a series of photos in a row, just like on Instagram. The researchers then studied adolescents using fMRI machines and recorded which regions of their brains lit up as they used the researchers’ version of Instagram. They also experimentally manipulated the number of likes a photo got as well as what types of photos the participants saw, including whether they saw their own photos or others’ photos and whether the photos depicted risky behaviors (like drinking alcohol) or neutral behaviors. They’ve since corroborated their results in young adults and for giving as well as receiving likes. As

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Online learning provider Everfi makes $100 million commitment for curriculum that pushes for social change

Education has been a hot topic lately. There are questions about the impact remote learning will have on kids, and controversy swirling around President Donald Trump’s recent calls to end racial sensitivity training across federal agencies and clamp down on a New York Times initiative called the 1619 Project, used by some schools to teach the history of slavery and its far-reaching consequences. In short: There’s lots to talk and worry about. 

To be sure, this is also an opportunity to rethink and revamp how and what we teach, for those who seize it. Online learning platforms are seeing a boom, and technology in general is being incorporated in unprecedented ways, which is actually helping to broaden the reach of educators in some regions of the world. What’s more, despite the rhetoric from the White House, the current racial reckoning is leading many in the private sector to up their

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Canadians don’t understand social gathering rules, second wave will be ‘more complicated,’ officials warn

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety.

Currently, there are more than 6,771 active cases of COVID-19 in Canada (with more than 134,900 diagnoses so far) and 9,100 deaths. Nearly 90 per cent of the country’s reported COVID-19 cases have recovered.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

September 14

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Canadians don’t understand social gathering rules, second wave will be ‘more complicated’, officials

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety.

Currently, there are more than 6,771 active cases of COVID-19 in Canada (with more than 134,900 diagnoses so far) and 9,100 deaths. Nearly 90 per cent of the country’s reported COVID-19 cases have recovered.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

September 14

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Learning pods help kids bridge social divide

Some parents who weren’t satisfied with the virtual end to the 2019-20 school year are turning to learning pods at the start of the 2020-21 school to ensure a bit of in-person education and socialization for their children.

The pods, sometimes called micro-schools, are often a group of students learning online in a shared learning space led by an adult — either a tutor paid to supervise and assist the students or a rotation of parents. 

Sometimes the pods are just for socializing, where a handful of students get together with, at times, a hired facilitator.

Regardless the purpose, trust among the families is key. “There is a lot of transparency in our pod, which is very crucial for this to even work,” Vikram Iyengar says about their four-child pod in Austin.

School at home: How to keep attending virtual classes from being a real pain in the neck

Learning

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Netflix’s new social media documentary, explained

Photo credit: Netflix
Photo credit: Netflix

From Digital Spy

Netflix’s new documentary The Social Dilemma attempts to expose the ways in which technology giants have manipulated human psychology to influence how we behave.

And if you think that sounds absolutely terrifying, you’d be right.

Social media and an endless catalogue of Apps have been integrated into the daily lives of many for years now. Facebook allows us to stay connected with friends and family around the world, Twitter gives us a read (for better and, sometimes, for very very worse) of what the public is feeling on any given subject, Uber can bring transport and food to our doors at the touch of a button.

While the negatives of such technological developments have been discussed before, from mental health implications to the looming question of data collection, The Social Dilemma goes behind the curtain of the biggest – and most profitable – tech

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Why our screens leave us hungry for more nutritious forms of social interaction

  <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://www.shutterstock.com/image-photo/facial-expression-female-teenager-screaming-while-564380758" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Shutterstock/LukyToky">Shutterstock/LukyToky</a></span>
Shutterstock/LukyToky

COVID-19 has seen all the rules change when it comes to social engagement. Workplaces and schools have closed, gatherings have been banned, and the use of social media and other online tools has risen to bridge the gap.

But as we continue to adapt to the various restrictions, we should remember that social media is the refined sugar of social interaction. In the same way that producing a bowl of white granules means removing minerals and vitamins from the sugarcane plant, social media strips out many valuable and sometimes necessarily challenging parts of “whole” human communication.

Fundamentally, social media dispenses with the nuance of dealing with a person in the flesh and all the signalling complexities of body language, vocal tone and speed of utterance. The immediacy and anonymity of social media also remove the (healthy) challenges of paying attention, properly processing information and responding with civility.

As a

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Everything you need for a virtual hen-do as social distancing rules are tightened

While you might not be able to meet up, you can still have a hen-do to remember thanks to platforms like zoom, Smule and Paperless Post (iStock)
While you might not be able to meet up, you can still have a hen-do to remember thanks to platforms like zoom, Smule and Paperless Post (iStock)

Throughout the pandemic, chances are you probably know someone – or are someone – who has had to cancel, postpone or re-arrange a wedding.

For many couples, lockdown has been a trying time as a day of celebration and one they may have been looking forward to for a long time have been put on pause.

If you know someone in that predicament, we’ve already got you covered with small gifts you can send as a thoughtful present here. Although on 23 June prime minister Boris Johnson announced small weddings of up to 30 people can now take place in the UK, it still might not be the day some people had originally planned.

But for others, it’s become a time to revaluate

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Why is Vin Scully jumping into social media at age 92? ‘I miss the fans’

Former Dodgers announcer Vin Scully has something to say — and he's not afraid to put it out there on social media. <span class=(Stephen Dunn / Getty Images)” src=”https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/ZIb.u592XEiW0UrXDbdB_Q–/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjt3PTcwNTtoPTQ2Ny40ODIxNDI4NTcxNDI4Mw–/https://media.zenfs.com/en/la_times_articles_853/c521773f141a4b3b3272a403483114fd” data-src=”https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/ZIb.u592XEiW0UrXDbdB_Q–/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjt3PTcwNTtoPTQ2Ny40ODIxNDI4NTcxNDI4Mw–/https://media.zenfs.com/en/la_times_articles_853/c521773f141a4b3b3272a403483114fd”/
Former Dodgers announcer Vin Scully has something to say — and he’s not afraid to put it out there on social media. (Stephen Dunn / Getty Images)

Out of nowhere, a monument fell.

One moment, Vin Scully was walking down his driveway to check on the mail. The next moment, he was lying face down on the pavement.

The unbreakable icon had collapsed, the eternal voice silenced. He awoke in the hospital with a concussion, broken nose, chipped tooth, three fractured ribs and a realization.

“It was like, ‘Hey, you’ve had a good life, but be ready pal, it’s just around the corner,'” said Scully, 92.

That was four months ago. The reasons for the fall were never determined. He hasn’t left his San Fernando Valley home since. He hasn’t even ventured back to that mailbox. His life now includes a walker,

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Trolls flood social media in Pakistan amid virus lockdown

ISLAMABAD (AP) — It was a music video meant to depict a young bride’s joy: Actress Saba Qamar, in a flowing white wedding gown with a golden hem, was twirled by the singer playing her groom in front of the mosaics of a 17th-century mosque in Pakistan’s eastern city of Lahore.

As soon as the video emerged earlier this month, it went viral — but for the wrong reasons. It infuriated religious radicals who inundated social media with claims that Qamar’s dancing sullied the historic Wazir Khan Mosque.

The uproar was the latest example of how trolling has exploded online in Pakistan since a lockdown, imposed in March over coronavirus concerns, confined tens of millions to their homes, leading to a 50% increase in internet use in this conservative Muslim nation of over 220 million people.

Minority rights activists and social media trackers say there has been a surge in

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