California artists try to adapt to new world wrought by pandemic

CBS News is chronicling what has changed for the lives of Americans in 2020 amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The coronavirus pandemic has forced California small business owner Stephanie Mufson to make dramatic changes to survive. In July, she told CBS News she wasn’t sure if her company Parade Guys, which builds floats and large displays for outdoor festivals would make it. 

Mufson, an independent artist, typically works with a team of contractors who are experts at painting, sculpting, and building floats for outdoor festivals and parades in the San Francisco Bay Area.

But in the last six months, festivals like the San Francisco Pride Parade and Fourth of July celebrations did not take place in person, resulting in economic hardship for the independent contractors who rely on those outdoor festivals for work. 

“It is not the same world that I spent most of my life basing my career around,” Mufson

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It’s World Suicide Prevention Day. Here’s how to spot warning signs

Refinery29

I Had Passive Suicidal Ideation. Here’s What Everyone Should Know

Life has hardly been easy lately. COVID-19 has catapulted even the mentally healthiest among us into fear or anxiety, and some warn that a global mental health crisis is looming. I consider it a gift, then, that it’s been a long time since I thought about not wanting to live.Passive suicidal ideation — thinking about, but not planning, one’s own death — became a familiar coping mechanism between my late teens, and it persisted into my late twenties. I’ve never actively wanted to die. Most days, I enjoyed my life. I was invested in my plans and looked forward to the future. But every now and then, when things were particularly difficult, I wanted to close my eyes and disappear. Thinking about no longer existing was like an emotional reflex, something I sometimes defaulted to when faced with internal

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Best visas around the world for adventurous digital nomads

 Bermuda is offering a visa for digital nomads (Bermuda)
Bermuda is offering a visa for digital nomads (Bermuda)

As the pandemic moulds us into an even more digital-first society, workers and employers have come to realise that plenty of jobs can be done entirely online.

With a computer, decent broadband connection and a little self-discipline, you can work from just about anywhere in this new era.

But who says working “from home” has to be your home? Or that “remote working” can’t be truly remote?

Destinations are cottoning on to the opportunities presented by a whole new breed of digital nomads and are offering visas to match. Here are some of the best places to potentially see out the pandemic without having to quit the day job.

Bermuda

Bermuda is offering year-long stays for people who want to work or study remotely, with a new scheme that launched in August.

The British Overseas Territory in the North Atlantic is

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Dungeons & Dragons’ new sourcebook brings diversity to fantasy world

The cover for Tasha's Cauldron of Everything, a new D&D sourcebook set to release Nov. 17.
The cover for Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything, a new D&D sourcebook set to release Nov. 17.

Those who dabble in fantasy worlds – books, videos, movies or classic tabletop role-playing games – probably have a preset idea of what an elf is. 

Fantasy worlds have their archetypes, and those standards haven’t left much room for diversity in the past. Dungeons & Dragons is looking to change that with an upcoming release. 

“Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything” – a fifth edition (5e) sourcebook set to debut Nov. 17 – expands a player’s ability to tinker with their character’s backstory and abilities inherent to playing a certain fantasy race within the game. 

“This is one of multiple books where we will be demonstrating a shift in how we handle certain things in the game, including the character race option,” said Jeremy Crawford, principal rules designer of Dungeons & Dragons and the lead designer

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‘All girls, buy it!’ In China, Perfect Diary gives cosmetics world a makeover with live streams, low prices

By Sophie Yu and Scott Murdoch

BEIJING/HONG KONG (Reuters) – With chat groups, video streams and low prices for foundation, China’s Perfect Diary has emerged from nowhere four years ago to become a cosmetics giant for the digital age, trailing only L’Oreal and LVMH in the world’s no. 2 market for make-up.

The Guangzhou-based beauty unicorn is now setting its sights on a Hong Kong initial public offering (IPO). Before that, it’s driving into Southeast Asia, targeting more millennial social media users like Wen Shan, a 21-year-old student from Guangdong.

Wen has ditched Western brands like NARS and Revlon and devotes her annual budget of 3,000 yuan ($434) to Perfect Diary cosmetics like eyeshadow palettes. Most cost less than 100 yuan and are made by the same contract manufacturers that supply Western brands.

She converted to Perfect Diary after a room-mate’s tip. “The foreign brands have a large variety of

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Dungeons & Dragons’ new sourcebook, ‘Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything,’ brings diversity to fantasy world

The cover for Tasha's Cauldron of Everything, a new D&D sourcebook set to release Nov. 17.
The cover for Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything, a new D&D sourcebook set to release Nov. 17.

Those who dabble in fantasy worlds – books, videos, movies or classic tabletop role-playing games – probably have a preset idea of what an elf is. 

Fantasy worlds have their archetypes, and those standards haven’t left much room for diversity in the past. Dungeons & Dragons is looking to change that with an upcoming release. 

“Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything” – a fifth edition (5e) sourcebook set to debut Nov. 17 – expands a player’s ability to tinker with their character’s backstory and abilities inherent to playing a certain fantasy race within the game. 

“This is one of multiple books where we will be demonstrating a shift in how we handle certain things in the game, including the character race option,” said Jeremy Crawford, principal rules designer of Dungeons & Dragons and the lead designer

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Colleges navigate the uncertain world of a pandemic, as students and faculty fear for their safety

The University of Notre Dame had a plan it thought would allow it to safely welcome students back to campus during the pandemic. But then everything went south; tests were nowhere near as available as planned, and the positivity rate climbed as the first week of classes, starting Aug. 10, continued. With the weekend came what public health officials warned about: parties. Reports cited at least two off-campus gatherings held over the weekend as the source of 80 new confirmed cases. The university promptly switched to remote learning for the next two weeks, letting students remain on campus as the administration figures out what to do next. How many other universities will go the way of Notre Dame?

Universities have suffered staggering losses in revenue due to the pandemic, and they know that bringing students back would at least help alleviate the financial pressure. But many are struggling with how

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Pope warns against the rich getting vaccine first; bargoer at Sturgis rally had COVID-19; world cases top 22M

First, the University of North Carolina. Now, North Carolina State University.

A day after university officials in Chapel Hill decided to pivot to online classes after at least four clusters of outbreaks of COVID-19 in student living spaces, the Raleigh university reported its first cluster of positive cases that included some of its own students.

Also Tuesday, the University of Notre Dame said it was moving to online classes for two weeks in hopes that infections won’t surge.

Meanwhile, a new survey shows that parents with children who have switched to online learning say they have gone into debt paying for all of the at-home school expenses, including breakfast and lunch, during the pandemic.

Some significant developments:

📈 Today’s numbers: The U.S. has 5.4 million confirmed infections and more than 171,000 deaths. Worldwide, there have been more than 781,000 deaths and 22.1 million cases, according to John Hopkins University data.

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UFC’s commentary team on what it’s like to be cageside for the biggest fights in the world

Who has the hardest job in the UFC?

You could argue that there are just shy of 600 correct answers to that question, with the name of any fighter who steps foot in the Octagon a valid response. Jon Anik, Megan Olivi and Brendan Fitzgerald wouldn’t dare to dispute that notion, but the truth is that all three of them – as part of the UFC’s wider broadcast team – are subject to a similar level of scrutiny and pressure to their colleagues on the other side of the Octagon fence. Then there is Dan Hardy, who has stood inside the ring wearing cuts and bruises, but who now sits outside it, wearing a headset and a mic.

Play-by-play commentators Anik and Fitzgerald provide vital layers to the soundtrack of the in-ring action on their respective nights on the job, their contributions for the viewers at home filling the space

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